What Happens If My Dog Eats Citronella?

If your dog eats citronella, the first thing you should do is call your veterinarian. Citronella is a plant-based oil that is used in many insect repellents. It can be toxic to dogs if they ingest too much of it.

Symptoms of toxicity include vomiting, diarrhea, loss of muscle coordination, depression, or even hypothermia, and seizures. If you think your dog has ingested citronella, call your vet or the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center at (888) 426-4435 for guidance.

Can Citronella Kill Dogs?

If you are a dog owner, you have probably wondered if citronella can kill dogs. The short answer is no, but there are a few caveats to consider.

if you put too much on your dog’s skin or rub it into their fur, they may develop irritation from the chemical properties of citronella oil. If your dog has sensitive skin or is prone to allergies, they may also experience irritation from citronella products.

In rare cases where dogs ingest large amounts of citronella oil, they could become sick or experience organ failure due to toxicity issues caused by ingesting an excessive amount of citronella oil at one time. This type of poisoning would require immediate veterinary treatment and monitoring until symptoms resolve themselves or begin improving over time with treatment.

What Happens If My Dog Eats a Citronella Candle?

If your dog eats a citronella candle, there is no need to panic. A small amount of wax will not cause them any harm.

However, if your dog ingests a large amount of wax from a citronella candle, they may experience an upset stomach or diarrhea. If this occurs, simply offer your dog some bland food and plenty of water to help them feel better.

What Happens If My Dog Licks Citronella Oil?

If your dog licks citronella oil, they may experience some digestive upset including vomiting and diarrhea.

In severe cases, citronella oil can cause liver damage. If you think your dog has ingested citronella oil, contact your veterinarian or animal poison control immediately.

Is Citronella Safe for Dogs to Smell?

While citronella is generally considered safe for dogs to smell occasionally, there are some precautions you should take when using it on your pet. For example, if your dog has allergies or sensitive skin, you might want to avoid using citronella-based products on them at all times. And while it’s generally considered safe for dogs to smell citronella candles or other products that contain the herb, it may not be safe for them to ingest them at all.

If you’re worried about the safety of citronella for your dog, talk with your vet before using any product that contains it on your pet.

How To Prevent Your Dog From Eating Citronella?

Here are some ways you can prevent your dog from eating citronella:

Educate your family about the danger of citronella in dogs. If you have children or other pets in the house, make sure they know that they shouldn’t give any products containing citronella to their pets because it’s dangerous for them.

Don’t let your dog go to the garden where there are citronella plants. Many people don’t even realize that their gardens contain this plant, so it’s important to keep an eye on your dog when they’re outside so you can keep them away from any areas where there are citronella plants growing.

Don’t use products containing citronella around your dog. If you want to use a product containing citronella near your pet, make sure that it’s sealed tightly so they can’t open it up and get into it.

Conclusion

If your dog ingests citronella, it is important to monitor them closely. Symptoms of citronella poisoning in dogs can include vomiting, diarrhea, drooling, loss of muscle coordination, depression, or even hypothermia. If you notice any of these symptoms, contact your veterinarian immediately.

Treatment for citronella poisoning will be based on the severity of the symptoms and may include IV fluids and medication to control seizures.

Share This Article To Help Others:

Dr Harunur Rashid (Harun) is a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine who has five years of experience in large pet animal medicine. He worked as a livestock officer for two years in an NGO, and since then he has been practicing pet animals medicine privately. He holds an MS in Pharmacology from Bangladesh Agricultural University and a DVM from the same institution.