Can I Use Diatomaceous Earth On My Dog?

Diatomaceous earth can be used on dogs as a means of flea and tick control. The powder is safe to use on dogs, but should not be inhaled by them. Also, ensure that you are ONLY using ‘food grade’ versions of Diatomaceous Earth as the ‘filter grade’ Diatomaceous Earth can be harmful to your dog.

How Do I Apply Diatomaceous Earth to My Dog?

To apply diatomaceous earth to your dog, start by getting some food-grade diatomaceous earth. You can find this at most health food stores or online. Avoid using filter-grade diatomaceous earth, as this type may contain harmful chemicals.

Next, put on some gloves and gently rub the powder into your dog’s fur, being careful not to get any in their eyes or nose. You can also sprinkle it around your home (especially in areas where your pet likes to rest) to help keep pests away.

Is Diatomaceous Earth Safe for Dogs Skin?

The short answer is yes, diatomaceous earth is considered safe for dogs when used correctly. This natural substance can be helpful in treating a variety of skin conditions, including allergies, hot spots, flea and tick infestations, and dry skin.

When applied topically to your dog’s skin, it works by absorbing oils and moisture, which then causes the exoskeletons of insects to dehydrate and ultimately die. When using diatomaceous earth on your dog, it’s important to choose food grade DE (you can find this at most health food stores), as opposed to the type used in swimming pools, which can be harmful if inhaled. You’ll also want to avoid getting any DE powder in your dog’s eyes or nose, as it can cause irritation.

What Does Diatomaceous Earth Do for Dogs?

Diatomaceous earth is a white powdery substance that is made up of the fossilized remains of tiny aquatic creatures called diatoms. The powder has sharp edges that can cut through the exoskeletons of insects, causing them to dehydrate and die. It is this same mechanism of action that makes diatomaceous earth effective against fleas on dogs.

When applied to the coat, diatomaceous earth will kill fleas by dehydrating them. It is important to note that diatomaceous earth does not kill fleas instantly – it can take a few hours for the powder to work its way into the insect’s exoskeleton and cause death. However, once it does take effect, it will continue to work as long as it stays on the skin, making it an ideal treatment for dogs who are prone to re-infestation.

Is Diatomaceous Earth Safe for Dogs to Walk on?

The short answer is yes, diatomaceous earth is considered safe for dogs (and humans) when used as directed. However, there are a few things you should keep in mind.

First off, although diatomaceous earth does kill fleas and ticks on contact, it’s important to realize that it only works when dry. If your dog gets wet after walking on diatomaceous earth, any fleas or ticks that are on him will be unaffected. So if you live in an area with a lot of fleas or ticks (or both), you may want to consider using another method of pest control in addition to diatomaceous earth.

Diatomaceous Earth for Dogs Side Effects

Diatomaceous earth is generally safe for humans and animals to consume, and it provides a number of health benefits. However, diatomaceous earth can also have side effects, especially when consumed in large quantities.

Some of the most common side effects include constipation, diarrhea, nausea, and vomiting. In rare cases, diatomaceous earth can also cause respiratory problems. If you’re considering giving your dog diatomaceous earth, it’s important to speak with your veterinarian first.

They can help you determine whether or not it’s right for your pet and they can also provide guidance on the proper dosage.

Conclusion

Yes, you can use diatomaceous earth on your dog. Just make sure to get food grade diatomaceous earth and not the kind used for swimming pools.

Share This Article To Help Others:

Dr Harunur Rashid (Harun) is a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine who has five years of experience in large pet animal medicine. He worked as a livestock officer for two years in an NGO, and since then he has been practicing pet animals medicine privately. He holds an MS in Pharmacology from Bangladesh Agricultural University and a DVM from the same institution.