Can Akitas Eat Watermelon?

Watermelon is a popular fruit among humans, but few people know that it’s also a great treat for your Akita. It’s nutrient-rich, low in cost and easy to prepare—which makes it an excellent choice for anyone looking to give their Akita something nutritious and delicious.

But can you feed watermelons for your Akitas? The short answer is ‘’Yes’’, you can feed watermelons for your Akitas. But there are lots of questions regarding this popular fruit: Is it safe for them to eat? What about the seeds? And what does it taste like?

We’ll answer every question regarding the safety of feeding watermelons to Akitas in this article. Let’s start with the most important question:

Are watermelons safe for Akitas?

Only the flesh of the watermelon is safe and nutritious. We do not recommend the rind and seeds for Akitas and might cause digestive upset.

It is best not to feed your Akita too much watermelon at once, as it can cause gastrointestinal upset. In addition, if you are feeding for the first time, watch for any abnormal signs, as rare, but some Akitas can show a food intolerance or allergic reaction. If you observe any abnormal symptoms, such as vomiting or diarrhea, discontinue feeding watermelon immediately.

It is better to introduce slowly until your Akita is used to eating it before giving in large quantities every day.

Benefits of watermelons in Akitas

 Watermelons are a great food for Akitas, as they are rich in many nutrients and vitamins.

Moisture: Watermelons are 92% water, so they can help keep your Akita hydrated on hot days or after exercise.

Vitamins A: Watermelons contain vitamin A, which is essential for good vision and healthy skin.

Vitamin B Complex: Watermelon contains the B complex group of vitamins, which are needed for energy production and metabolism.

Vitamin C: Vitamin C helps to build strong bones and teeth in Akitas. It also helps Akitas fight off infection by boosting their immune systems when they’re sick.

Lycopene: Lycopene is a carotenoid pigment that gives watermelon its deep red coloration (and makes it look like blood). It’s beneficial because it helps prevent cancer in humans and Akitas!

Potassium: Potassium is an essential mineral that helps regulate blood pressure levels and aids in muscle function.

Do all Akitas like watermelons?

Unfortunately, no, your Akitas may not like watermelons. Akitas have food preferences just like humans and they are more likely to enjoy the flavor of a fruit that they are familiar with. Many Akitas can be allergic to watermelon.

If you want to introduce watermelon to your Akita, do so slowly and consult with your vet before introducing a new food to make sure that it is healthy for them.

Instead of forcing your Akita to eat watermelon, try other Akita-friendly fruits like bananas, apples, pears or mangos.

Can my Akitas have watermelons every day?

There’s no rule on how often Akitas can eat watermelon. Yes, you can feed Akitas the recommended amount of watermelon every day if they like it. 

But we recommend you to vary the treats because your Akitas can get bored. Also, different treats contain different nutrients, so it’s important that your Akita gets a balanced diet.

Can puppies eat watermelons?

Watermelons are a healthy treat for puppies, but they should not be given to your puppy until it is at least 2 months old. Watermelon has a lot of water and very little nutritional value, so it’s important that your puppy is on a specialized puppy diet during the first two months.

After that period, start with just a small bite of watermelon once or twice a week and see how your Akita reacts. If your Akita seems fine, you can continue to introduce watermelon as an occasional treat.

Be careful! Puppies have very delicate digestive systems and might not digest watermelon seeds. Consult with the vet before introducing any new food to your puppy’s diet.

How much watermelon can Akitas eat?

According to Dr. Jeff Werber, a veterinarian who specializes in nutrition and treats, it depends on the age, size and activity level of your Akita. If you’re not sure how much to feed your pup, consult with your vet for the best serving size.

But as a general rule of thumb, smaller pup breeds (<20 lbs) can eat about ½ cup diced watermelon flesh per day. Large pup breeds (>20 lbs) can have about 1 cup diced watermelon flesh per day.

Portion control is important for your Akitas diet and treats. Start small and if there are no adverse reactions in your dog’s digestive system or other health issues, you can offer more later on.

Always follow the rule: your Akitas need a completely balanced diet; all treats combined should not be over 10% of the total diet.

How to serve watermelons to your Akitas?

Watermelon is a great choice for Akitas, but like any other food, it’s important to serve them in the right way.

First, check with your vet to make sure watermelon is OK for your Akitas diet. Watermelons are high in vitamin A and C, and they’re also low in calories, which makes them a smart choice for Akitas who need to lose weight or reduce their overall caloric intake.

You can use watermelon in a few different ways:

* Feeding watermelon chunks is probably the most convenient option. Just cut up a piece of watermelon and feed it whole! Just make sure that you don’t feed too much—it’s easy for Akitas to overeat this fruit, so monitor how much your Akita eats at one time.

* Pureeing the flesh of the watermelon makes it easier for your Akita to digest, since the digestion process is smoother when there are fewer large pieces of fruit. You can add some plain yogurt or cottage cheese if you think your Akita would like something creamy with his pureed fruit.

* You can also make watermelon ice cream by pureeing some chunks with plain yogurt or cottage cheese and adding it to an ice cream maker.

When are watermelons bad for Akitas?

Watermelons are bad for Akitas if they have underlying health issues, like allergies or diabetes. If you know your Akita has these conditions, it’s important to pay extra attention to what he eats. Watermelons are also bad for your Akita if he overindulges in them—like if he eats an entire watermelon in one sitting.

There are a few other things you should know about watermelons and your Akita:

* Watermelon rinds can be harmful to Akitas. Make sure you throw these away after cutting the fruit open.

* Seeds are also harmful to Akitas as it can pose a choking hazard, so remove them before serving the fruit up.

* The skin of a watermelon is not harmful to Akitas, but it’s still not recommended that you feed them the skin because it could cause an upset stomach or diarrhea if eaten in large quantities (which is always a risk of any treat).

What happens when your Akitas eat too much watermelon?

Diarrhea: Akitas that eat too much watermelon can experience diarrhea. This is not a serious condition, but it can be an inconvenience to the Akita owner.

Constipation: Akitas that eat too much watermelon may also experience constipation. If your Akita has been eating too much watermelon, expect this symptom to occur.

Abdominal pain: Akitas that eat too much watermelon may also experience abdominal pain throughout their body because of the excess amount of water in their diet.

Choking hazard: If your Akita eats too much watermelon, they could choke on the seeds inside the fruit and become injured or even die because of it happening (if you don’t act fast enough).

Other human foods Akitas can eat

What other human foods can Akitas eat? Here is a list of some other human foods your Akitas can eat.

So, can Akitas eat watermelons?

Yes, Akitas can eat watermelons. Watermelons are rich in water and nutrients, making it an excellent treat for Akitas. Remove seeds and rinds before giving your Akita any part of the watermelon.

Don’t overfeed, follow the 90/10 rule. This means that you should feed your Akita 90% of his daily food requirements and 10% from treats like watermelon.

Watermelons are high in fibers and sugar, so if you give your Akita too much at once, he may get sick.

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Dr Harunur Rashid (Harun) is a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine who has five years of experience in large pet animal medicine. He worked as a livestock officer for two years in an NGO, and since then he has been practicing pet animals medicine privately. He holds an MS in Pharmacology from Bangladesh Agricultural University and a DVM from the same institution.